Home SWAGGAR HEALTH & FITNESS Train, Fight And Recover With This Hard-Hitting Home Workout

Train, Fight And Recover With This Hard-Hitting Home Workout

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Home workouts can quickly get very boring — but that doesn’t mean you should give up committing to them altogether. 

(Related: The complete guide to working your back at home)

To help you burn fat in the (dis)comfort of your own home, we tapped-up Charlie Watts, PT and founder of London-based boxing gym Manor, to devise a home workout that packs a serious punch, but will also help you recover. 

“Recovery is a key element to optimise your health, fitness, performance and wellness as well. It is something we all used when we were competing as athletes and we saw the benefits,” says Watts. “People are training hard and smashing workouts but they’re not necessarily mobilising, stretching and resting properly. Health and fitness are two completely different things, and we wanted to educate people a bit more on that.”

(Related: Does cardio actually burn muscle? We asked a sports scientist)

(Related: 8 signs someone is suffering from anxiety)

Broken into three parts, this workout helps you train, fight and recover. The first section of the workout follows an AMRAP (as many rounds as possible) format. Work through 10 reps of each of the four bodyweight moves for eight continuous minutes, without taking your foot off the gas. Then, for three rounds, shadow box for a whole minute with a 10-second speed round in each. For part three, work through each stretch for 30 seconds for two total rounds. 

Believe us, you’ll be on top of the world after.  

Manor’s #StrongNotSilent campaign is a project championed by SAS: Who Dares Wins’ Jason Fox, a UK special forces veteran who is now campaigning for social change surrounding mental health. “I am proud to be supporting such a bold campaign; suicide is an issue that is close to my heart and we are hoping to create as much of an impact as possible,” says Watts. “StrongNotSilent has also been an emotional learning curve for me personally, and has opened doors into areas of my life that I may previously have resisted looking into too closely. The most important message we hope to convey is that it is okay to talk, and more men need to share their struggle.”



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